Hot day in the City

Here is some video of bees bearding. This is often confused with a “swarm”. The bees are trying to stay cool outside the hive. This is a new nuc that I have not moved to my box because I wanted them to get very strong.

Visit to the Bee Farm

Picked up some new nucs early this morning from the bee farm.

My current two hive fizzed out. In part due to size and I can see that there were some wax moths left from a previous year. Even though I inspected and froze my frames. They were persistent. Below is a collage of my new bees

I will keep you posted on my updates. This nuc is very strong. They couldn’t wait to get home. A few stragglers flew around my car on the ride back from Howard County.

Bee Safe! Michelle

Small Hive

This has been a challenging time. Went to visit a hive today and found less than 20 bees.

Visit 5/24/20 – formation of small queen peanut

The recent rains has not helped this hive and I may have to pickup a new package. Thus, one of the plights of modern beekeeping is the constant cycle of issues.

Bee Safe! Michelle

Bee Check

Today I saw a story on the news story on “killer hornets” so I decided to check on my hive. It is a beautiful day and so far the hive is doing well.

Here is a quick video

Bee 🐝 Video

Stay Safe! Michelle

Bee Progress

Just a quick check-in at the home hive. It has been a little more than two weeks since the install and the hive is doing well.

Stay safe and Take care🐝

I am back!

Sorry for the radio silence on the site and lack of new posts! This winter has been busy.

The weird winter weather was not good for my bees. Sadly, I lost my last hive a few weeks ago so I am in a rebuilding mode.

This seasons post may focus more on my garden and pollinator friendly activities. I will still be a sources of support for new keepers but, I will probably curtail my number of hives.

Below are some shots of the winter aftermath.

Fall Keeping

Sorry for the delay for my lack of posts. Here are some photos of my outing today!

I went to both sites in Park Heights to check on some hives for the other keepers. I found that I am at 50% of my hives made it through which isn’t so bad. Only one was invested with moths. Here are some more photos below:

I will be doing some visits as the weather cools and I will be doing some feeding. I added some entrance feeders today so that they have a chance.

Happy Fall! I will post again soon!

Michelle🐝

Feeding at Dusk

This is an update on the feeding process and my latest visit at dusk on December 13, 2017. After working on a few projects this week, I finally got a chance to check on the bees, on Wednesday evening at dusk. The forecast for that evening was for light snows and sleet and the weather was in low 30’s to high – 20’s.  The wind was biting cold and my fingers despite having on gloves froze quickly so I tried to be as efficient as possible while still trying to document the visit with my SLR.

Due to the temperatures, bees tend to cluster.  Definition of Clustering: The worker bees huddle around the queen bee at the center of the cluster, shivering to keep the center between 27 °C (81 °F) at the start of winter and 34 °C (93 °F) once the queen resumes laying. The worker bees rotate through the cluster from the outside to the inside so that no bee gets too cold.

Below are some key details from my visit:

  1. Bee Candy Results: The results of my no-cook bee candy (candy bar). It crumbled because I may have added too many drops of essential oil.  It smelled great but it was sort of fail. I am going to have to reassemble new bars.
  2. Removing Frames: I took out empty frames and added honey from other hives that failed. I froze these other frames for at least 48 hours at home as per the advice of other beekeepers to remove issues of wax moths.
  3. Second Hive Issues: In the second hive (this is a stronger hive) the frames were glued together (propolitized – propolis) due to greater activity by the colony in the second box. Due to the cold temperature and impending nightfall, I did not spend a lot of time so I left the sugar on top and closed the hive quickly.

Lessons Learned: 

  1. Bee Candy Redo: I will try a cooked version or use less essential oil in my no-cook recipe.
  2. Next year I will be better at: Working my frames more. Get into these hives more often to reduce the issue with propolis
  3. Time well spent: That the care and feeding of these bees has been worth it and I have learned a lot!

I will do another check soon. Over the last few weeks, I have been collecting equipment and beginning my winter rehab and preparations. This next few posts will be on these endeavors.

Michelle 🙂

 

 

Hive update – late November

The holidays took their toll on my posting habits but, I visited the hives regularly and took photos on these visit. The photos are not that exciting due to the lack of action so I posted a small collage to summarize.

Since the temperature has dropped the activity at the hives have slowed dramatically. As far as an update, I believe that the weaker hive has died out and only the second one remains. Below is some video that I took on my visit on Monday.

Over the next week, I will prepare “bee candy” for the remaining hive. Making fondant is not my specialty but, I have found some recipes that I may try so wish me luck😉☘️

My next posts will be of candy project and more detailed information on my process for wintering my equipment.

Look out for future posts on beekeeping information sessions and events that I will be hosting in Baltimore this winter.

Michelle

 

 

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