Fall Keeping

Sorry for the delay for my lack of posts. Here are some photos of my outing today!

I went to both sites in Park Heights to check on some hives for the other keepers. I found that I am at 50% of my hives made it through which isn’t so bad. Only one was invested with moths. Here are some more photos below:

I will be doing some visits as the weather cools and I will be doing some feeding. I added some entrance feeders today so that they have a chance.

Happy Fall! I will post again soon!

Michelle🐝

Busy summer

Sorry about my lack of recent posts! I am still around and my bees 🐝 are healthy.

Above is a photo of one of my several sunflowers đŸŒ» in my yard. I have taken a bit of break on the blog but, my hope over the next few weeks is to post the many photos and stories that I have documented over the last few months so please stay tuned!

Best Wishes!

Michelle

Preparing for New Bees

On Sunday, we got some work done. We rehabilitated and collected honey frames from hives to start again for the spring.

Above are photos of me scraping the excess propolis and honey comb. I just got 10 packages yesterday and this morning, Warren and woke up at 5 am to do the install of around 7 of the hives.

I will post more photos and my progress in the next few days.

If you want to see me in action, I will be hosting an event at Real Food Farms on Friday, May 18th at 4 pm.

Michelle

Sunday Morning at Real Food Farms

I met Will one of the farm managers at the site to look at the hives. We discovered one of was lost during the winter.

Will was excited to see the honey frames and posed for me above. I will be back to the Farm because they have donated equipment to BeeMore for use and rehabilitation.

I will be holding an event here in May stay tuned for more information.

Have a great Sunday!

Michelle

Seedlings at Park Heights

People often ask me how and why I started beekeeping and BeeMore and it all goes back to the garden. This morning, I dropped by the offices before an Earth day event and I was inspired by these seedlings which started off like this…or probably more like this last summer

So it’s great to see the early evolution of these plants before we put them in the garden when the weather warms a but more.

Happy Earth Day!

Michelle

🐝 Bee Friday

Happy Bee Friday!

Watching the bees fly into the hive today on their pollen gathering journey, I realized that the statistic that can fly up to 15 mph is very accurate. These ladies were moving so fast that I could not capture their speed. The recent brisk spring temperatures have made move faster but today was another good sign the hive is doing well after 2 weeks and will be ready to move to a community garden site.

Bee back with you soon!

Michelle

Spring at the garden

It’s mid April and spring has finally arrived. I came out this morning to check in at the garden in Park Heights to find that one of my fellow beekeepers new hives are doing well.

The recent change in weather and blooms are out!

More updates to come!

Michelle

New Bees 🐝

Below are some quick photos of the new bee package install. I was bey lucky to get Warren to help me. This package was more robust than I thought so I may be able to do a split soon. I will put up a more detailed post shortly but this is a teaser for my spring installations.

Winter Work

Part of the winter beekeeping work is rehabbing equipment for the next season. I wanted to share the details for those who may inherit or have to reuse their previous year’s equipment.

The purchasing of pre-owned equipment is often tricky because beekeepers are wary of stuff that they do not have knowledge of because it may have been infected by American Foulbrood or other diseases that may have caused the colony to collapse.

My thought in documenting this process was to better inform potential beekeepers of some of the steps of maintenance in the offseason. Thus, the preparing boxes for reuse is a key task because if you have bees that die of other causes you can still reuse the equipment if you take right precautions and these steps also help you to preserve your equipment investment.

These are boxes that I purchased earlier this fall from a fellow beekeeper that had some damage due to wax moth damage. In order to reuse these boxes, I had to scrape and clean them outside. Lucky, I did this work before the super cold snap (in Nov/Dec 2017), and I used some straightforward tools that I got from the $1 store (note: small and large paint scrapers). I also used the hose at high pressure to blast of the last cocoons. Once the boxes were dry, I brought them indoors and with the help of Katie S, we started the next phase.

It is recommended to burn the leftover wax and inside corners of the boxes, thus removing all of the yucky remnants. For safety, we had a fire extinguisher on hand and since I am walking accident, I left the blowtorch work to Katie. She also used a small tool to clean out the top crevices of the boxes as well.

Finally, painting the outside of the boxes with two coats of outdoor high gloss paint gave the boxes a new life. The boxes will be airing out for the winter so that there is plenty of time for any fumes to dissipate. The painted boxes will weather longer and hold up to the elements much better than untreated wood.

Note: That it is less expensive to buy unpainted equipment and do it yourself if you are purchasing a large number of boxes. There are often deals on bulk boxes and new bee equipment but, if you are buying a single hive, the price difference is slight. I suggest that you go ahead and pay the extra $5-7 for painted boxes, it is worth the money and time.

In future posts, I will share the artistic transformation of these boxes. I will also share the assembly process of the many new boxes that I purchased this summer.

Michelle

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