This Weekend: Biodynamic Beekeeping Event at WWS!

An interesting seminar being held in Washington, DC.

Green Dragon Bytes

Join our sister school, the Washington Waldorf School,  for a two session workshop on Biodynamic Beekeeping with Gunther Hauk of Spikenard Farm Honeybee Sanctuary on Friday, January 19th, 6:30pm-9pm, and Saturday, January 20th from 9:30am -12:30pm. The workshops are free, and more information can be found below. RSVP’s are required and can be made here. The Facebook event can be found here.

WWS beekeeping flyer

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New Videos

 

I started playing around with a new program Adobe Spark and it is a great tool! The program creates online slideshow videos, social media posts, and other great marketing items.  Over the next few weeks, I will be developing new videos and presentations for BeeMore.

Check out our About BeeMore video and pass it on to your friends so that they can learn more about BeeMore.

Thanks!

Michelle

 

 

Happy New Year from BeeMore

Happy New Year! I did a quick check on the bees 🐝 after a few weeks away from the garden and we have had extremely cold temperatures in Baltimore. Temperatures have fallen into the teens this past week, so I did not expect the hive to be very active.

But, I opened up the lid to find that the candy bar had not been touched yet this was not a surprise since they should have some honey.

Otherwise, it was pretty cold and I found that my some of my hoop house plants froze as well. 😔

Below is some quick video from my visit. Enjoy 😉

Stay warm! And, I will post some more updates soon.

Michelle😊

Feeding at Dusk

This is an update on the feeding process and my latest visit at dusk on December 13, 2017. After working on a few projects this week, I finally got a chance to check on the bees, on Wednesday evening at dusk. The forecast for that evening was for light snows and sleet and the weather was in low 30’s to high – 20’s.  The wind was biting cold and my fingers despite having on gloves froze quickly so I tried to be as efficient as possible while still trying to document the visit with my SLR.

Due to the temperatures, bees tend to cluster.  Definition of Clustering: The worker bees huddle around the queen bee at the center of the cluster, shivering to keep the center between 27 °C (81 °F) at the start of winter and 34 °C (93 °F) once the queen resumes laying. The worker bees rotate through the cluster from the outside to the inside so that no bee gets too cold.

Below are some key details from my visit:

  1. Bee Candy Results: The results of my no-cook bee candy (candy bar). It crumbled because I may have added too many drops of essential oil.  It smelled great but it was sort of fail. I am going to have to reassemble new bars.
  2. Removing Frames: I took out empty frames and added honey from other hives that failed. I froze these other frames for at least 48 hours at home as per the advice of other beekeepers to remove issues of wax moths.
  3. Second Hive Issues: In the second hive (this is a stronger hive) the frames were glued together (propolitized – propolis) due to greater activity by the colony in the second box. Due to the cold temperature and impending nightfall, I did not spend a lot of time so I left the sugar on top and closed the hive quickly.

Lessons Learned: 

  1. Bee Candy Redo: I will try a cooked version or use less essential oil in my no-cook recipe.
  2. Next year I will be better at: Working my frames more. Get into these hives more often to reduce the issue with propolis
  3. Time well spent: That the care and feeding of these bees has been worth it and I have learned a lot!

I will do another check soon. Over the last few weeks, I have been collecting equipment and beginning my winter rehab and preparations. This next few posts will be on these endeavors.

Michelle 🙂

 

 

Hive Help

 

 

Here are some photos of my helpers. This was my first hive!

The good thing about family is that they work for free! Even my husband Warren got into the act. He has proven to be pretty brave and opened the hive to allow me to take the photo above.

Sophie is decked out in her boots and my garden gloves.

Why BeeMore?

The facts on the plight of the honey bee are very compelling.  I  started my beekeeping journey after learning about the process of beekeeping from a local beekeeper who had hives in Park Heights. These hives supported the pollination of the two site.

The goal of BeeMore is to match beekeepers with urban garden sites and create new beekeepers in the City of Baltimore. The BeeMore Cooperative project will reduce the barrier to entry for new beekeepers by assisting with training and providing mentors. It also will help to create an active network of Baltimore City honey producers.

Below are photos of the Park Heights Community Health Alliance garden.

For more information on BeeMore contact Michelle Bailey-Hedgepeth.

Adventures in BeeMore

I started my bee adventure in 2016, shadowing others, and this spring I got my 1st package. As with all new beekeepers, I have made my mistakes, but I am learning.  This site will document my journeys in beekeeping and the startup process of the BeeMore Project.

Below are photos from one of my visit to the hives in September 2016.

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