Busy summer

Sorry about my lack of recent posts! I am still around and my bees 🐝 are healthy.

Above is a photo of one of my several sunflowers 🌻 in my yard. I have taken a bit of break on the blog but, my hope over the next few weeks is to post the many photos and stories that I have documented over the last few months so please stay tuned!

Best Wishes!

Michelle

Preparing for New Bees

On Sunday, we got some work done. We rehabilitated and collected honey frames from hives to start again for the spring.

Above are photos of me scraping the excess propolis and honey comb. I just got 10 packages yesterday and this morning, Warren and woke up at 5 am to do the install of around 7 of the hives.

I will post more photos and my progress in the next few days.

If you want to see me in action, I will be hosting an event at Real Food Farms on Friday, May 18th at 4 pm.

Michelle

🐝 Bee Friday

Happy Bee Friday!

Watching the bees fly into the hive today on their pollen gathering journey, I realized that the statistic that can fly up to 15 mph is very accurate. These ladies were moving so fast that I could not capture their speed. The recent brisk spring temperatures have made move faster but today was another good sign the hive is doing well after 2 weeks and will be ready to move to a community garden site.

Bee back with you soon!

Michelle

Spring at the garden

It’s mid April and spring has finally arrived. I came out this morning to check in at the garden in Park Heights to find that one of my fellow beekeepers new hives are doing well.

The recent change in weather and blooms are out!

More updates to come!

Michelle

New Bees 🐝

Below are some quick photos of the new bee package install. I was bey lucky to get Warren to help me. This package was more robust than I thought so I may be able to do a split soon. I will put up a more detailed post shortly but this is a teaser for my spring installations.

Brief Spring in Baltimore

Above is a quick video of the bees in🐝 Park Heights on a warm winter day this week! This is the one surviving hives from one of the other beekeepers at the site.

The temperature was over 70 degrees that day and there is some clover on the field. It’s was a great day for getting out of the hive.

Michelle

The warm up…or really more of the same.

This morning, I ventured out to check on the hives and greenhouses after the deep freeze of the past two weeks.  A found a few bees working in the hive which was a good sign. The white stuff is the sugar or bee candy that I made a few weeks ago.

Most of the vegetation in the area is still frozen from the frost but, its good to see that my bees persist.  Even though 40+ degree weather feels balm to us because of the persistent cold, to the bees it’s just another winter day.

Stay Warm!

Michelle

img_0734

Feeding at Dusk

This is an update on the feeding process and my latest visit at dusk on December 13, 2017. After working on a few projects this week, I finally got a chance to check on the bees, on Wednesday evening at dusk. The forecast for that evening was for light snows and sleet and the weather was in low 30’s to high – 20’s.  The wind was biting cold and my fingers despite having on gloves froze quickly so I tried to be as efficient as possible while still trying to document the visit with my SLR.

Due to the temperatures, bees tend to cluster.  Definition of Clustering: The worker bees huddle around the queen bee at the center of the cluster, shivering to keep the center between 27 °C (81 °F) at the start of winter and 34 °C (93 °F) once the queen resumes laying. The worker bees rotate through the cluster from the outside to the inside so that no bee gets too cold.

Below are some key details from my visit:

  1. Bee Candy Results: The results of my no-cook bee candy (candy bar). It crumbled because I may have added too many drops of essential oil.  It smelled great but it was sort of fail. I am going to have to reassemble new bars.
  2. Removing Frames: I took out empty frames and added honey from other hives that failed. I froze these other frames for at least 48 hours at home as per the advice of other beekeepers to remove issues of wax moths.
  3. Second Hive Issues: In the second hive (this is a stronger hive) the frames were glued together (propolitized – propolis) due to greater activity by the colony in the second box. Due to the cold temperature and impending nightfall, I did not spend a lot of time so I left the sugar on top and closed the hive quickly.

Lessons Learned: 

  1. Bee Candy Redo: I will try a cooked version or use less essential oil in my no-cook recipe.
  2. Next year I will be better at: Working my frames more. Get into these hives more often to reduce the issue with propolis
  3. Time well spent: That the care and feeding of these bees has been worth it and I have learned a lot!

I will do another check soon. Over the last few weeks, I have been collecting equipment and beginning my winter rehab and preparations. This next few posts will be on these endeavors.

Michelle 🙂

 

 

First Snow…

 

So there not much to this post but I went to check on the hives early on Saturday morning. The bees were inside like expected and nothing much to report since I was the dumb one taking photos in the snow…

In my rush this week, I did not install my mouse guards or add the bee candy as planned. But, I got some work done on freezing frames from the other hives and gathering donated local wax. I will share this in another post.

With the changing of the season officially, I will start to focus on the inside aspects after finishing up the last few chores. A good thing is that the ground was still warm and this snow should melt within the next day or two. The weather report shows that it will get into the forties this week which will allow me to get these last task done, but I thought that I would share the nice snowy shots on the site.

Below are some photos of my house later in the afternoon. It snowed all day and we got a few inches of snow but we lucked out with the pavement being warm so no shoveling 🙂

Michelle

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑