Adventures in BeeMore

I started my bee adventure in 2016, shadowing others, and this spring I got my 1st package. As with all new beekeepers, I have made my mistakes, but I am learning.  This site will document my journeys in beekeeping and the start up process of the BeeMore Project.

Below are photos from one of my visit to the hives in September 2016.

Featured post

Spring at the garden

It’s mid April and spring has finally arrived. I came out this morning to check in at the garden in Park Heights to find that one of my fellow beekeepers new hives are doing well.

The recent change in weather and blooms are out!

More updates to come!

Michelle

New Bees 🐝

Below are some quick photos of the new bee package install. I was bey lucky to get Warren to help me. This package was more robust than I thought so I may be able to do a split soon. I will put up a more detailed post shortly but this is a teaser for my spring installations.

🌻 Sunflower Starters 🌻

Over the last few weeks, I started some flower seeds inside because of the recent Nor’easter. My hope is to get a jump start on the pollinator friendly plants.

I thought that I would share some tips on indoor planting that I found on the internet.

  • Make sure you use a larger pot or even cup because these seed grow quick.
  • Make sure the soil temperature is 65-70 degrees. This plant is above a heat vent so these have taken off better than the ones in my kitchen.
  • Water every 2 or 3 days.
  • Wait until it’s above 65 to transplant.

Good Luck 🍀

I will be getting my 1st set of new bees on April 7th. So look out for some new bee 🐝 posts.

Michelle

Project Sunflower

IMG_2183 (2)
Summer Bee

I am currently a taking the UME Baltimore City Master Gardener course and last week we talked about pollinators which is one of my favorite topics. It sparked me to look at my garden and what I plant. Last year, I planted sunflowers and they were great in my garden. I found that sunflowers attracted a myriad of bees and other pollinators.

This year as part of my work with BeeMore, I am going up my game a bit by planting additional sunflowers at different sites. I found some great resources on this and the ongoing Great Sunflower Project.

I will share more on my efforts to support Project Sunflower.

Michelle

 

Brief Spring in Baltimore

Above is a quick video of the bees in🐝 Park Heights on a warm winter day this week! This is the one surviving hives from one of the other beekeepers at the site.

The temperature was over 70 degrees that day and there is some clover on the field. It’s was a great day for getting out of the hive.

Michelle

Extracting Honey – Part 1

Today, I started the honey extraction process. There are a few tools and items you want to have on hand when you are doing this process:

  • 8×10 Tarp (Camping Grade)
  • 5 Gallon Bucket (food grade w/ cover)
  • A Capping Knife or Tool
  • A few pairs of Disposable Gloves
  • A Honey Strainer or Mesh Bag
  • A Spatula
  • Newspaper, Plastic containers and other things to mitigate the mess.

Here is a link to a video that explains the steps I took to do this first extraction. I only did a few frames so, I will post additional updates on the process to share the efficiencies that I have found.

Just in case you missed it! Check out the Extraction Video

Michelle

 

Some Bee Facts

Since its the winter and my post from the hives are limited. I wanted to add some interesting bee facts that I found on the internets.

Fun facts about bees:

  • Honeybees are the only insect that produces food eaten by humans.
  • Worker honey bees are female.
  • Drones are male honey bees.
  • The average worker bee produces only 1/12 teaspoon of honey over her lifetime.
  • A worker bee lives about 6 weeks. The queen bee can live to be 5 years old.
  • Honey never spoils.
  • To make one pound of honey, bees must visit 2 million flowers.
  • There are nearly 20,000 known species of bees in seven recognized biological families. They are found on every continent except Antarctica, in every habitat on the planet that contains insect-pollinated flowering plants.

I thought that some of these facts may be helpful getting to know more about the ever important bee.

Michelle

This Weekend: Biodynamic Beekeeping Event at WWS!

An interesting seminar being held in Washington, DC.

Green Dragon Bytes

Join our sister school, the Washington Waldorf School,  for a two session workshop on Biodynamic Beekeeping with Gunther Hauk of Spikenard Farm Honeybee Sanctuary on Friday, January 19th, 6:30pm-9pm, and Saturday, January 20th from 9:30am -12:30pm. The workshops are free, and more information can be found below. RSVP’s are required and can be made here. The Facebook event can be found here.

WWS beekeeping flyer

View original post

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑